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The decline of wild bees linked to the use of neonicotinoid pesticides

The decline of wild bees linked to the use of neonicotinoid pesticides

The report was prepared by a team of experts led by Ben Woodcock of the Center for Ecology and Hydrology in Wallingford, UK, and conducted over a period of 18 years.

The research focused on 62 species of bees in the United Kingdom and linked the decline detected in their population during those years with the increase in the use of so-called neonicotinoid pesticides.

These types of products are used in many types of crops around the world and it has already been shown, according to Nature, that they are harmful to bees and bumblebees.

However, to date most studies have only succeeded in testing short-term effects in experimental settings.

In the United Kingdom, these pesticides were approved for use in 2002, and by 2011 the percentage of seeds in British crops treated with them had increased by 83%.

"Applications of these pesticides have influenced changes in the bee population"

Woodcock and his team examined how large-scale applications of these pesticides have influenced changes in the bee population among the 62 classes studied, between 1994 and 2011.

In their conclusions, the experts determined that there was a three times greater probability that the population of bees would decrease in the cases of bees that looked for their food in crops treated with these pesticides than in those that fed on wild plants or other types of crops.

EFE Green


Video: Bee Population Collapse Might Be Due to Common Pesticide (September 2021).